REVIEW: Fleetwood Mac – Mirage (Deluxe Edition)

If ever there was a case of the media building up and then knocking down a band, it was the one involving Fleetwood Mac in the late-’70s and early-’80s. The critics cheered when the group—newly energized by the addition of Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks—delivered its chart-topping eponymous album in 1975 and the even better Rumours a year later.

But many of those same critics spoke less kindly of the follow-up to Rumours, 1979’s Tusk. According to them, it eschewed commercialism in favor of self-indulgent experimentation, though major experimentation was in fact largely limited to the excellent title cut. Then, when the group reverted to fully accessible form on its next studio album, 1982’s Mirage, reviewers griped that the band was going backwards; never mind that this radio-friendly LP delivered exactly what the critics claimed was missing in its predecessor.

Well, as I noted last year, Tusk ranks among the most underrated albums of the rock era. But Mirage—which Fleetwood Mac’s members recorded in France after pursuing solo projects—is arguably even more underrated. …

Read the full review at The Morton Report

Jeff Burger / The Morton Report / Monday, September 26, 2016

 

 

Tusk expands

New box set expands, reveals Fleetwood Mac’s enigmatic opus

When the five members of Fleetwood Mac reconvened in the studio in 1978 to record the follow-up to their massively successful/decade-defining/inescapable disc Rumours, it would have been painfully easy to simply spit out Rumours II.

Instead, they took 13 months and spent a then-unprecedented $1 million-plus to birth Tusk, a double album of 20 songs spanning 72 minutes. The effort defied expectations, confounded some fans, sold “only” 4 million units, and produced only two singles resembling hits: the tribal-sounding title track (recorded with the 112-piece University of Southern California Trojan Marching Band), and Stevie Nicks’ ethereal “Sara.”

However, a funny thing happened with Tusk in the ensuing 35 years. Its standing among both Mac fans and musicians has skyrocketed, as has respect for the wildly diverse songs and experimentation. Now, Rhino/Warner Brothers has released Tusk: The Deluxe Edition. The 5-CD/2-LP/1-DVD set includes the original album remastered, a bevy of outtakes and alternate takes, and plenty of live material from the ensuing tour.

In the booklet of liner notes and rare photos, Jim Irvin celebrates the potpourri grab bag of music, spearheaded by Lindsey Buckingham’s newfound infatuation with the sounds of punk and New Wave music, and a desire to not repeat the same old formula. He would even adopt an entirely new look for the photos shoots and tour of closely cropped hair, suits, and…uh…heavy makeup.

“Listening to Tusk is like walking around a ridiculously eclectic art gallery curated by someone who’s keeping their aesthetic a secret,” Irvin offers. “And old master next to an abstract, a kinetic sculpture next to a watercolour. It makes no sense at first.”

Though, contrary to the established Rock History Narrative of him fighting for the change alone, both Nicks and Mick Fleetwood and not just Buckingham were also eager to shake things up, according to their own comments today.

And what of the effect as a whole? Buckingham certainly brings an un-Mac-like tension, nervous energy, and biting sarcasm to efforts like the deranged square-dance sound of “The Ledge,” the punkish “What Makes You Think You’re the One,” the biting “Not That Funny,” and the “rockabilly on acid” of “That’s Enough For Me.”

Stevie Nicks, always given something of a short shrift in terms of songwriting since she doesn’t play an instrument (not counting the tambourine), offers some of her finest work in the longing “Storms,” an upbeat “Angel,” elegiac “Beautiful Child,” and mysterious “Sisters of the Moon,” which surprisingly resurfaced on the set list for the Mac’s recent reunion tours.

Only Christine McVie’s contributions seem slight and listless — both lyrically and musically — save for some soft-and-gentle work on her usual romantic balladry in “Over and Over” and “Brown Eyes.”

Tusk‘s recording period saw Christine’s involvement with both Grant Curry (the band’s lighting director) and Beach Boy Dennis Wilson, while Buckingham fell into an intense involvement with record-company exec/former model Carol Ann Harris (who later wrote a not-that-flattering book about the relationship, Storms).

The shocker, fans later found out, was the news of Nicks and Fleetwood’s brief-but-intense involvement. It led to Fleetwood’s divorce from Jenny Boyd…who had previously had an affair with previous lineup guitarist Bob Weston…and was the sister of Rock’s Greatest Muse, Pattie Boyd, who sent both George Harrison and Eric Clapton into romantic bliss and yearning, poured out on vinyl.

And when Nicks and Fleetwood’s involvement ended, Nicks’ best friend, Sara Recor (partial inspiration for the song), took up with Fleetwood without either bothering to tell Nicks about it, which crushed her (are you following all of this?).

Thus, Nicks admits today that a number of her songs are about Fleetwood, and it’s not hard to interpret many of hers and Buckingham’s lyrics as continued musical snipes and judgments on their relationship.

Of the demos and alternate versions, there’s some very interesting development chronicled in the songs “I Know I’m Not Wrong” and “Tusk” as Buckingham — like he did with much of the material — tinkered with them in his own studio extensively before bringing them to the band. It was a way of songwriting that gave him more control, but which the band agreed to abandon after Tusk.

And on the live discs, listeners will find a band surprisingly willing to take risks with tempos and delivery onstage with material recorded in studio. And that includes tunes from their previous two records, Fleetwood Mac and Rumours.

So, while the hefty Deluxe Edition of Tusk may be for Mac Addicts only (and those with record players), less expensive options included a 3-CD Expanded Edition and a 1-CD Remastered effort.

In either case, for what attention and sometimes derision it received on release, Tusk is the one effort in the band’s discography whose standing has improved with time. Oh, and the meaning the title? It was Fleetwood’s slang term for a penis. You’re welcome for that.

Bob Ruggiero / Houston Press / Monday, December 28, 2015

REVIEW: Tusk (Deluxe Edition)

Tusk (Deluxe Edition) Fleetwood Mac Rhino

**** 1/2 (four-and-a-1/2 stars out of five)

The Mac’s wild, punk-y follow-up to Rumours hits just as hard 36 years later, especially on this extras-packed reissue.

While the music scenes of England, New York City and scattered bohemian enclaves the world over embraced punk’s do-it-yourself radicalization in the late Seventies, nearly every superstar of sunny southern California kept on making smooth and glossy soft rock as if Joey Ramone and Johnny Rotten had never happened. This didn’t comfort Lindsey Buckingham. The pressure to follow Fleetwood Mac’s astronomically successful 1977 LP, Rumours, with a follow-up just like it drove the singer-guitarist to turn to Talking Heads, Elvis Costello and other upstarts for inspiration and liberation.

And so he began what became 1979’s famously experimental and eclectic double-disc, Tusk, at home with the deliberate goal of shaking things up. While Buckingham crafted his unconventional solo recordings, the Mac had Studio D at L.A.’s Village Recorder built to their specifications, where they added to his songs and recorded their own with results that veered from demo-quality rockabilly to exacting balladry. Both capitalized on the freedom that came with their success: Because drummer Mick Fleetwood himself managed the band, absolutely no one but the musicians and their near-exclusive producer-engineers Richard Dashut and Ken Caillat had any input. Tusk may have been the first album to cost a million dollars, but much of it was in spirit and practice nearly as DIY as the era’s New Wave.

Sequenced for maximum disruptive effect, Tusk alternately reassures and startles: Christine McVie’s placid lullaby “One More Time (Over & Over)” opens the album with a soothing dose of musical morphine, but gets followed by the wake-up call of Buckingham’s anxious “The Ledge,” the album’s most punk-influenced track. As confirmed in the interviews that accompany this deluxe five-CD/two-LP/one-DVD box set edition, much of Tusk – like its predecessor – is a Rashomon-esque account of life within the band as seen through the sharply contrasting viewpoints of their three songwriters. One of Stevie Nicks’s most delicate and downhearted songs, “Storms,” wallows in the guilt over her affair with then-married Fleetwood, and the subsequent karmic payback she endured when her best friend secretly moved into his house. Buckingham’s confrontational “Not That Funny” addresses Nicks, by then his ex, whom he saw as getting caught up in celebrity culture. It’s this candid quality that makes Tusk so contemporary even decades later.

Tusk’s one-of-a-kind combo of punky verisimilitude and surreal opulence drives one point home harder than ever: No other band could’ve recorded this album.

That forthrightness gets magnified exponentially by the deluxe edition’s supplemental discs. One of them, “The Alternate Tusk,” presents the entire album via divergent versions of every song, including an early, piano-led rendition of Nicks’s “Sara” that lingers for nearly nine minutes; and Buckingham’s languid “That’s All for Everyone,” here featuring entirely different lyrics. Another disc, “Singles, Outtakes, Sessions,” demonstrates through multiple editions of some tracks like Buckingham’s “I Know I’m Not Wrong” – the first song recorded for the album, but the last one to be definitively completed – how the album evolved during Tusk’s year-long creation. The version of “Save Me a Place” on this disc lacks the weeping bluegrass harmonies that define the released take, but Buckingham’s vocal here is even more pained. Two discs of “Tusk Tour Live” serve as a considerably longer and looser alternate edition of the band’s 1980 live album, which chronicled that same world trek. And the set’s audio DVD provides a new 5.1 surround sound mix by Caillat that maximizes the album’s one-of-a-kind combo of punky verisimilitude and surreal opulence, and drives one point home harder than ever: No other band could’ve recorded Tusk.

Barry Walters / Rolling Stone / Tuesday, December 22, 2015

Fleetwood Mac Tusk (Deluxe Edition)

Tusk Deluxe EditionAfter all of the mythologising — the most expensive rock album ever produced; a staggering commercial failure; a Lindsey Buckingham vanity project with the Fleetwood Mac name attached; what happens when too much money meets too much blow — Tusk remains a singular oddity in Fleetwood Mac’s oeuvre. By the time its recording commenced in June 1978, the band were in the stratosphere of commercial success: their previous album, Rumours, had shipped millions of copies and was on its way to becoming one of the best selling albums of all time. Yet the music that had inspired Buckingham during his respite from the gruelling Rumours tour was the opposite of commercial: the debut albums from The Clash and Talking Heads, both recorded on the cheap. As Rob Trucks recounts in his 33⅓ entry on the album, Tusk began its life as an ultimatum from Buckingham to band leader Mick Fleetwood: Buckingham had new songs he was going to record. In response, Fleetwood shot back another ultimatum: Buckingham was either in the band or out of it. The stage was set for a collision: between the moneyed, high-gloss world the band inhabited and the scrappy upstarts who were shaking that world’s foundations; between Buckingham’s musical ambitions and Fleetwood’s determination that Fleetwood Mac stick together as a band.

Tusk, therefore, is riven through with contradictions. It contains some of the band’s glossiest work, of the sort that would have made the executives at Warner hopeful that Tusk could function as Rumours Redux: the gorgeous “Sara,” Stevie Nicks’s aching paean of love and loss; Christine McVie’s rock burner “Think About Me,” complete with acid lyrics that would fuel further speculation about the band’s private lives; the lapidary “Storms,” featuring Nicks at her most pitilessly introspective. Yet these songs find themselves nestled between Buckingham’s off-kilter, deliberately lo-fi ditties: deliberately truncated songs (none longer than 3:32) with unusual, unresolved melodies, in which Buckingham affects a falsetto and Fleetwood sounds as though he were drumming with a set of cardboard boxes. You’d be hard-pressed to call these numbers “punk” per se — they thrum through with Buckingham’s interest in folk and blues traditions, and they were after all recorded at phenomenal expense — but they preserve punk rock’s affinity for simplicity and concision. In many ways they sound like exactly what they are: punk rock reflected back through the funhouse mirror of a platinum-selling band with a well-documented cocaine problem, a limitless recording budget, and a background in blues.

It’s no secret that Tusk performed poorly on its release, shipping a mere two million copies in its first few months of existence compared to the over ten million copies that Rumours shifted. Just who the fault can be pinned on remains the subject of some debate. Did Tusk‘s commerical failure, as Warner’s executives insisted, derive from Buckingham’s outré songwriting? Was it, as Mick Fleetwood argued, because the album was prematurely leaked to the RKO radio network, who proceeded to play it in order, much to the delight of home tapers? In the long view, such considerations are immaterial: given the album’s strange afterlives — including a start-to-finish cover version by Camper Van Beethoven and becoming a formative influence on Carl Newman’s work with The New Pornographers — it seems that Tusk has ultimately vindicated itself.

The latest remaster and reissue of the album — the third such intervention to have happened since the 1980s — is about as comprehensive as anyone could hope for. In addition to the original album, which has been given a crisp buff and polish (albeit one that could have preserved a little more of the original release’s dynamic range), and a second disc of single versions and demos (many of which originally appeared on the 2004 remaster/reissue), it also includes a start-to-finish version of Tusk in hitherto unreleased alternate takes and two discs of live material from the band’s 1979-1980 Tusk tour. Mac anoraks will find that the second disc’s collection of successive demos — which map out the progression of both “I Know I’m Not Wrong” and the title track from their early incarnations through to near-finished versions — illuminates the band’s creative processes.

Perhaps more interesting is the third disc, sequenced from unreleased alternate versions: while many songs sound essentially like rough-hewn versions of what would appear on the final release, it’s worth listening to just for the lengthy version of “Sara,” in which Nicks elaborates on the song’s themes in an extended outro. The live material on discs four and five is perhaps less essential: much of it is actually from prior albums rather than Tusk, and perhaps inadvertently demonstrates the cold shoulder with which the public received the album. (When Christine McVie introduces “Over & Over” to a crowd at St. Louis by informing them that it’s from the new album, the reception is rather more muted than the ecstatic cheers that greet the version of “Dreams” recorded at Wembley on the same tour.) Perhaps most interesting about these discs is the valiant attempt by the band to fit Buckingham’s Tusk songs into the stadium-rock mode: “Not That Funny” shifts into bombast, with Fleetwood hammering the kit and Buckingham belting out his lines, and Buckingham shreds out a solo that wouldn’t have been out of place on Rumours at the conclusion of “What Makes You Think You’re The One.”

These efforts to make Tusk‘s material appeal to the band’s demographic demonstrate just how much it began its life as an album out of time, an artifact that could not have been produced at any other juncture in history but one that, equally, sounded completely ill-at-ease in the cultural moment that produced it. Perhaps fittingly, time has been kind to Tusk, and the album doesn’t require the ultra-deluxe treatment to make a compelling case for its relevance — those two LP’s worth of creative tension, that juxtaposition of the rough and the smooth, are worth returning to with or without the context provided by this reissue.

(Editor’s note: This article was edited for spelling and grammar. You can read the original article here.)

Chad Parkhill / The Quietus / Wednesday, December 16, 2015

ALBUM REVIEW: Tusk Deluxe

Tusk Deluxe EditionHad Fleetwood Mac played it safe after Rumours, they probably could have made another gajillion-selling album. Instead, they handed the reins to singer and guitarist Lindsey Buckingham and allowed him to steer the follow-up to one of the 20th century’s biggest LPs to wherever he wanted (with a few detours along the way).

The result was 1979’s double-LP Tusk, a much-delayed, over-budget and sprawling masterwork that often played out like Fleetwood Mac’s version of the Beatles’ White Album: three distinct singer-songwriters hashing out their solo compositions while the rest of the group played backing band. And it was, if you believed what you read at the time, a total bomb.

But 36 years later, Tusk stands as one of rock’s most underrated and rewarding albums, a complex and layer-revealing work that offers new perspectives and treasures with each listen. A new five-disc Deluxe Edition doesn’t so much give fresh insight to the record as it provides a behind-the-scenes peek at its formation and development, as well as the occasional struggles the band endured during its long and difficult birth.

The original two-LP set is expanded with discs of single remixes, outtakes, session leftovers, live cuts from the 1979-80 tour in support of the album and the entire record made up of mostly previously unreleased versions of the 20 songs. It’s as often fascinating as it is repetitive: Even for an album built on textures and detailed studio assembling, multiple takes on the title track and “I Know I’m Not Wrong” begin to get tedious after the fourth pass.

Still, alternate versions of “Over & Over” (the ambiance-soaked Christine McVie ballad that opens the album), “The Ledge,” “That’s All for Everyone” and “Brown Eyes” (with early member Peter Green prominently sitting in) show just how meticulous the recordings were … and just how much the band was slowly unraveling. Buckingham is clearly in control here, injecting flashes of weirdness and brilliance into the project. Stevie Nicks‘ contributions tend to be the least affected by his mad-scientist tinkering, but even they go deeper than Rumours‘ most intricate tracks.

Tusk: Deluxe Edition doesn’t show us much in the way of how skeletal demos evolved into multi-layered art pieces, though — it’s not that kind of box. If anything, it leads us to believe that most of these songs were fully structured by the time Fleetwood Mac began recording. And radio mixes of “Think About Me” and “Not That Funny” prove that even after the LP’s release, some cuts took on even newer forms.

It’s a lot to get through — more than 80 songs in all — and parts of it seem like padding (the live tracks, mostly from 1975’s self-titled album, Rumours and Tusk, sound diluted without their studio adornments). But the original album is worth diving into again, if only to revisit one of the era’s most undervalued works, a bold record made by a superstar band willing to risk its place at the top for its art.

Michael Gallucci / Ultimate Classic Rock / Thursday, December 3, 2015

VIDEOS 11/22: Leg 4 ends in Auckland

Fleetwood Mac has completed four legs of the On With the Show Tour, performing 120 shows! The band wrapped up the New Zealand leg of the tour on Sunday night with a final performance at Mt Smart Stadium in Penrose, a suburb of Auckland. Unlike the previous night, showers subsided enough for fans to enjoy the show comfortably without having to wear their ponchos.

Angus and Julia Stone were the support act. Since the beginning of the tour, the Australian duo has posted pictures from their touing experience on Twitter.

Angus and Julia Stone
(Photo: @angusjuliastone)

Jump to: Videos | Live Tweets | Set List

Live Tweets

Videos

Thanks to Craig Beardsley, David Marx, MorganGKelly, msnod3, Robs Music Videos, Greg Shepard, Jackson Whitham, and r Wong for capturing and sharing this footage!

COMPILATION: You Make Loving Fun / Everywhere / Say You Love Me / Sara / Gypsy / Littles Lies/ Go Your Own Way / Songbird (Greg Shepard)

COMPILATION: Second Hand News / Dreams / Rhiannon / Everywhere / Tusk / Say You Love Me / Landslide / Never Going Back Again / Think about Me / Gypsy speech / Gypsy / Go Your Own Way / World Turning / Don’t Stop / Silver Springs / Songbird / Mick’s speech (MorganGKelly)

The Chain (David Marx)
[jwplayer mediaid=”226428″]

The Chain – partial (msnod3)

You Make Loving Fun (msnod3)

Dreams – short clip (Craig Beardsley)

Dreams (msnod3)

Rhiannon (msnod3)

Rhiannon (Mike Devery)

Everywhere (David Marx)
[jwplayer mediaid=”226427″]

Everywhere (msnod3)

Tusk (msnod3)

Big Love (Greg Shepard)

Big Love (msnod3)

Landslide (msnod3)

Landslide (r Wong)

Gypsy – intro (Mike Devery)

Little Lies (msnod3)

Gold Dust Woman – partial (msnod3)

I’m So Afraid (Robs Music Videos)

Go Your Own Way (msnod3)

Go Your Own Way (Jackson Whitham)

Set List

  1. The Chain
  2. You Make Loving Fun
  3. Dreams
  4. Second Hand News
  5. Rhiannon
  6. Everywhere
  7. Bleed to Love Her (replaces I Know I’m Not Wrong)
  8. Tusk
  9. Sara (replaces Sisters of the Moon)
  10. Say You Love Me
  11. Big Love
  12. Landslide
  13. Never Going Back Again
  14. Think About Me (replaces Over My Head)
  15. Gypsy
  16. Little Lies
  17. Gold Dust Woman
  18. I’m So Afraid
  19. Go Your Own Way
  20. World Turning (encore 1)
  21. Don’t Stop
  22. Silver Springs
  23. Songbird (encore 2)

REVIEW: Despite storm, Fleetwood Mac smash out the hits

Thunder only happens when it’s raining: Fleetwood Mac performed for two hours in a storm.

If you’re planning on heading to Fleetwood Mac’s last show in Auckland tonight, listen to your Mum’s old advice and take an extra layer, even if you think you don’t need one.

Last night’s concert at Mt Smart Stadium saw thousands of Mac fans drenched in the beginnings of a storm, barrelled by wind and generally, just a bit miserable.

If you’re at all familiar with the wicked witchery of Stevie Nicks you’d be convinced the songstress brought last night’s storm on herself.

Fleetwood Mac’s Hollywood, Dream and many more songs hail the rain.

Lindsey Buckingham
(Photo: Chris McKeen)

Take; “I don’t care for sunny weather / I like the change of seasons better / I love the feel of rain upon my face” and “Thunder only happens when it’s raining…When the rain washes you clean, you’ll know, you’ll know”.

And suddenly, despite the fact that everyone was soaked through and freezing cold, we were still dancing to the sounds of Lindsey Buckingham’s rock voice and insane guitar skills, Christine McVie’s fingers moving over the keys and her rasping voice belting out the songs, Mick Fleetwood bashing away at the drums and of course, Nicks’s higher register ringing through the stadium.

The lights, the slightly hazy images of Nicks’s tassled gypsy outfit as she spun in circles, the sound of thousands singing “Tell Me Lies” over the sound of rain, the eerie sound of Nicks and Buckingham’s voices on the long-held notes of “Rhiannon” while the wind blew – there was something kind of magical about it.

Nicks talked extensively about the All Blacks – because when in Rome – and Buckingham talked candidly about how the foursome had come through their hard times to still be together on stage now, and how it’d only made them stronger. And he and Stevie played on their old romances throughout the night, leaning in close, whispering to one another.

And McVie looked pleased as punch to be back, rejoining the group after missing the last tour.

Christine McVie
(Photo: Chris McKeen)

However, conscious of the fact that we were all dripping wet, they kept the banter to a minimum and just smashed out hit after hit, all voices unfailingly on point, the crowd singing, dancing, swaying and spinning along with them.

Tonight is Fleetwood Mac’s last show of their tour, and they’re stoked to be ending it in “such a cultural place”.

I’d recommend you go, especially if the sky stays blue but if not, rug up warm.

Siena Yates / Fairfax New Zealand / Sunday, November 22, 2015

REVIEW: Fleetwood Mac in Auckland

Fleetwood Mac
Fleetwood Mac perform at Mt Smart Stadium in front of a rain soaked audience. Photo / Steven McNicholl (Photo: Steven McNicholl)

The title of Fleetwood Mac’s 15-month world tour ‘On With The Show’ felt especially fitting as the heavens opened above Mt Smart Stadium in Auckland last night in a pre-summer monsoon.

But the rain did little to dampen the spirits of the 38,000 people who’d turned out for the second to last night of the tour – the biggest crowd the legendary five-piece have played to since they reunited in September last year.

The audience might have been getting soaked, but for many this was a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to see Mick Fleetwood, Lindsey Buckingham, John McVie, Stevie Nicks and Christine McVie all together once more, and they were ready to let the rain wash them clean, go their own way, and break some chains.

And so were Fleetwood Mac. Their two-hour set was laden with hits, and right from opener “The Chain,” it was clear the five longtime bandmates and one-time lovers have put the years of turbulence well behind them, and now delight in giving these songs a truly heartfelt rendition.

There was no sign of any lagging energy from the group, who are now all close to 70.

Fleetwood Mac fans
Fans braved the weather in rain coats and ponchos. (Photo: Steven McNicholl)

In fact they seem invigorated by the tour, with Buckingham especially spirited, occasionally prowling round the stage like a big cat as he led with his guitar, and Stevie Nicks as other-worldly and vivacious as ever with her husky tones and gothic gypsy-queen outfit.

Their mid-set stripped back numbers together, “Landslide” and “Never Going Back Again,” were beautifully tender, while Buckingham’s “Big Love” solo was a stormer.

It was a particular highlight to see McVie come out from behind the keyboard for “Everywhere.” And her piano-accordion playing on “Tusk” was a wonderfully eccentric addition to the song.

Huge singalongs are what Fleetwood Mac has always done best, though, and last night was no exception with “Dreams,” “Little Lies” and “Go Your Own Way” providing the high points.

With so many hits already fired from the cannon, the crowd was curious to hear what the encore would bring, but it was a pleasure to see Fleetwood become a wild cave man drummer on “World Turning,” and it wouldn’t have been a complete evening without “Don’t Stop” or “Silver Springs.”

To top it all off, hearing McVie sing “Songbird” was a perfectly poignant end to an incredible concert.

Fleetwood Mac play Mt Smart Stadium once more tomorrow night, and there are still select tickets available.

Lydia Jenkin / New Zealand Herald / Sunday, November 22, 2015

VIDEOS 11/21: Mt Smart Stadium, Penrose NZ (Night 1)

Fleetwood Mac concert tickets
(Photo: David Marx)

On Saturday, Fleetwood Mac performed the first of two shows at Mt Smart Stadium in Penrose, a suburb of Auckland in New Zealand. Rain gear was once again the fashion of choice, as wind and showers swept through the area for most of the evening.

Angus and Julia Stone were the support act.

Recording artist Lorde took to social media to post her experience of attending the “best concert” of her life.

Lorde Instagram post
(Lorde via Instagram)

Fleetwood Mac performs again at Mt Smart Stadium on Sunday.

Jump to: Videos | Live Tweets | Set List

Videos

Thanks to Andy p, Mike Devery, Brendan Lynch, David Marx, David Spear, and jaseirvine for capturing and sharing this footage!

COMPILATION: Sara / Go Your Own Way / Don’t Stop / (jaseirvine)

The Chain (David Marx)
[jwplayer mediaid=”224662″]

Dreams – partial (Brendan Lynch)

Rhiannon – partial (Mike Devery)

Tusk (David Spear)

Big Love – partial (David Spear)

Landslide (Mike Devery)

Sara (Mike Devery)

Sara – partial (Andy p)

Think about Me (David Marx)
[jwplayer mediaid=”225056″]

Gold Dust Woman – partial (Mike Devery)

Go Your Own Way (Mike Devery)

Go Your Own Way – partial (Brendan Lynch)

Live Tweets

https://twitter.com/niamh_priest/status/667928408404262912

Set List

  1. The Chain
  2. You Make Loving Fun
  3. Dreams
  4. Second Hand News
  5. Rhiannon
  6. Everywhere
  7. Bleed to Love Her (replaces I Know I’m Not Wrong)
  8. Tusk
  9. Sara (replaces Sisters of the Moon)
  10. Say You Love Me
  11. Big Love
  12. Landslide
  13. Never Going Back Again
  14. Think About Me (replaces Over My Head)
  15. Gypsy
  16. Little Lies
  17. Gold Dust Woman
  18. I’m So Afraid
  19. Go Your Own Way
  20. World Turning (encore 1)
  21. Don’t Stop
  22. Silver Springs
  23. Songbird (encore 2)

REVIEW: Multitudes held in harmonic thrall

Relationship issues, personal turmoil . . . and that’s just some of the audience.

No, but seriously.

Last night, at Dunedin’s Forsyth Barr Stadium, Fleetwood Mac added further resonance to songs that long ago escaped the confines of urban cool and found a home amid millions of suburban lounges.

Having honed the template for soft-rock singalongs and a radio-friendly slickness belying the hurt and heartbreak often integral to a tune’s genesis, the group reminded all that the distance between stage and stadium seats is best spanned by a combination of honest communication and energy.

That was best personified by guitarist-singer Lindsey Buckingham, who led the band in many respects.

Certainly, he, Mick Fleetwood, John McVie, Stevie Nicks and Christine McVie, all responsible for groundbreaking 1977 album Rumours, lived up to the title of their tour, ”On With The Show”, performing for more than two and a-half hours.

The excellent, slightly unhinged guitar solos of Buckingham and the drumming flurries of the seemingly octopedal Fleetwood notwithstanding, the band’s best moments came by way of those famous vocal harmonies, even if their musical machine took a few songs to get warm on a night less about rock chic as rugged-up sensibility.

Nicks’ rendition of the laidback “Sara” was one highlight, as was “Rhiannon” (even if it began slightly sluggishly) and impeccable versions of mega-hits “Little Lies” and “Go Your Own Way” (the latter prompting one youngish man to gain the stage only to be promptly removed) and a Nicks-Buckingham duet, “Landslide,” which they dedicated to the late Jonah Lomu and the All Blacks.

The title of “Don’t Stop (Thinking About Tomorrow)” and its words (”yesterday’s gone, yesterday’s gone . . .”) might suggest it’s better to look forward than back.

Thus, let’s not salute this band’s staying power, but rather the power these musicians hold when they inhabit the moment.

Among the echoes of a set-list to die for?

About 35,000 voices roaring as one.

Shane Gilchrist / Otago Daily Times / Thursday, Nov 19, 2015