Fleetwood Mac ranks #10 on ‘The Rich List’

(Photo: Joshua Mellin)
(Photo: Joshua Mellin)

On Monday, Billboard revealed its ranking of the highest-paid musicians of the past year. Fleetwood Mac made the Top 10, ranking at #10 with gross earnings topping $19 million in 2013.

Fleetwood Mac’s numbers were fueled by a highly lucrative 2013 North American and European tour and the release of Extended Play and Deluxe and Expanded reissues of their 1977 classic album Rumours.

10. Fleetwood Mac
2013 Earnings: $19,123,101.98

As befits this classic rock mainstay, the bulk of Fleetwood Mac’s earnings came from its 2013 world tour, which covered 34 cities and take-home pay of $17.4 million. The trek’s high point included three nights at London’s O2 Arena. There, Christine McVie, 70, joined the band for the final two shows to perform “Don’t Stop” — a prelude to her coming back full-time for 2014’s Reunion Tour (that trek was potentially sidetracked due to the recent cancer diagnosis of John McVie, 68). The band also released its first new studio material in a decade, Extended Play. It reached No. 48 on the Billboard 200.

Music’s Top 40 Money Makers 2014: The Rich List

  1. Taylor Swift
  2. Kenny Chesney
  3. Justin Timberlake
  4. Bon Jovi
  5. Rolling stones
  6. Beyoncé
  7. Maroon 5
  8. Luke Bryan
  9. P!nk
  10. Fleetwood Mac
  11. Justin Bieber
  12. Bruno Mars
  13. One Direction
  14. Jason Aldean
  15. George Strait
  16. Jay Z
  17. Michael Bublé
  18. Mumford & Sons
  19. Dave Matthews band
  20. Rihanna
  21. Paul McCartney
  22. The Eagles
  23. Celion Dion
  24. Trans-Siberian Orchestra
  25. Phish
  26. Kayne West
  27. Blake Shelton
  28. John Mayer
  29. New Kids on the Block
  30. Zac Brown Band
  31. Imagine Dragons
  32. Jimmy Buffett
  33. Elton John
  34. Rascal Flatts
  35. Rush
  36. Miranda Lambert
  37. Lil Wayne
  38. Tim McGraw
  39. Eminem
  40. Carrie Underwood

METHODOLOGY: The data used to compile Money Makers was supplied by Nielsen SoundScan, Nielsen BDS and Billboard Boxscore. Artists are ranked by U.S. earnings, calculated from touring, recorded- music sales, publishing royalties and revenue from digital music and video streaming. Due to a lack of data, revenue from sponsor- ship, merchandising and synchronization isn’t included. For album and track sales, Billboard assumed a royalty rate of 20 percent of retail, minus producers’ fees. Billboard treated all streaming revenue as derived from licensing deals and split that to calculate the artist’s take. Billboard applied statutory mechanical rates for album and track sales and Copyright Royalty Board-determined rates or -approved formulas for streaming. For labels’ direct deals with interactive services, Billboard used a blended rate of $0.00525 for audio and $0.005 for video streams. Billboard subtracted a manager’s fee of 10 percent. For box office, each artist was credited with 34 percent of the gross, typically what’s left after the promoter and manager’s cuts and other costs are subtracted.

Author: Stevie Nicks Info

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